Respect – 16th Sept

RESPECT

PowerPoint Download (requires sound) 37MB  Respect PowerPoint Download

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Script (if you want to use it)…..

SLIDE 1

Todays assembly is about our QE Value of RESPECT

What does ‘Respect’ mean to you ?

….’Respect’ is rooted in ‘Kindness’.

What might lead someone to be kind?

People might do nice things because they think there’s something in it for them. It might help their reputation and social standing, or there might be a financial reward in it for them. Or there might be a sudden emergency and instinct could kick in to help someone in danger…

SLIDE 2 (click to play video) 30 secs

 

SLIDE 3

All of these are completely understandable motives for doing something kind and nice for other people. But what we saw in the video clip was that, as one person came to help, so did more and more, until everyone on the train and platform was united in trying to help the single passenger in distress. This domino effect is powerful, and it can happen more slowly and subtly than in the emergency situation we saw on the station platform in Australia.

 

The Domino Effect (source)

There are global movements like Random Acts of Kindness and Pay It Forward which are founded on the idea that if each of us acts kindly towards another person for no other reason than that it’s a nice thing – the right thing – to do, it has the cumulative effect of making the world better for all of us. And this is not a new idea!

SLIDE 4

Marcus Aurelius (source)

Marcus Aurelius was Roman Emperor from 161 to 180 AD, and a renowned philosopher in the Stoic school. In his book Meditations, he lays out his guide to self-improvement, including in the twelfth book this simple advice:

If it’s not right, don’t do it

If it’s not true, don’t say it.

This is a great maxim to live by; indeed, if we all stuck to that rule, our school /our world would certainly be a better one. The only thing his advice is telling us what not to do. But if we flip it around we get an even more powerful message:

If it’s right, do it.

If it’s true, say it.

SLIDE 5

But of course, truth always needs to be tempered with kindness. And, before we act of speak, we need to think carefully about our actions and words.

Think before your speak (source)

 

Here is a story which shows how unselfish acts of kindness really do lead to a domino effect which can change not just one person’s life, but the world.

SLIDE 6

Jonny Benjamin (source)

This is Jonny Benjamin. In 2007, aged just 20, he was diagnosed with a mental illness, schizophrenia, and hospitalised. Desperate, and unable to understand his condition or see any way out, on January 14th 2008 he walked out of hospital in London and on to Waterloo Bridge, intending to throw himself off into the icy waters below. Hundreds of Londoners were walking across the bridge on their way to work. How many of them saw what was happening? How many walked on? We don’t know. But we do know that one man stopped and spoke to Jonny. He offered to buy him a cup of coffee, and he said words which changed Jonny’s life. He said: “you can get through this. You can get better.”  Up until that moment, nobody had told Jonny that getting better was a possibility. And, in that moment, Jonny himself stepped back from the brink. After twenty five minutes of talking, he came down. The police took him away. And the stranger went on his way to work.

Jonny went on to control his condition with medication and treatment, and became a campaigner for mental health, raising awareness of the condition so that other sufferers have people to tell them “you can get through this; you can get better.” Last year, he ran a campaign to find the stranger on the bridge who stopped and helped him six years earlier, using social media to track him down. He found him. He is a man called Neil Laybourn, who said this:

“In truth, it could have been anyone who stopped that day. It could have been the person behind me, but this time it was me.”

Neil’s kindness saved Jonny’s life, and Jonny’s life has gone on to save countless others through his campaigning work. He couldn’t have known that at the moment he chose to stop and help; in that moment, he was just doing the right thing because it was the right thing to do.

This is called ‘ALTRUISM’

SLIDE 7

Altruism: being nice for no reason (source)
When we do something nice for no reason, everybody benefits. We feel better; we make somebody else’s life better too. At school this week – and from now on – make sure that you choose kindness. Do something nice for somebody else. Help one another. Not because there’s anything in it for you, but because when you do something kind, you’ve made school a nicer place for someone else to be. And if it’s a nicer place for someone else, it’ll be nicer for you too. So when you choose kindness, everybody benefits.

SLIDE 8 (click to play video) 5ms 43 secs

Here is a  5 minute video that shows that domino effect we talked about earlier…

So think about how you could do this this week.

  • Open a door for someone else.
  • Pick up a piece of litter.
  • Smile at someone
  • Thank somebody.
  • Help someone.

…its that easy!

Have a great week.